In the news articles

The Dystopian Future of Food

The Dystopian Future of Food

Although food in America is cheaper than ever, the future of food will continue to reflect a deep economic divide between classes, according to Paste. That division is in the form of those who can afford the expense of organic, healthy foods and those who rely on cheaper heavily processed foods for daily meals. For

A Look at the Diet of 2050

A recent article in Forbes Israel takes a look at some of the things that might be on the dinner table of 2050. Predictions include genetically engineered functional foods like fish with added omega-3s, products tailored to every segment of the population, personalized 3-D-printed foods, fortified food rations for developing countries, superfoods such as algae,

A Glimpse at the Future of Food

According to an article in the Rude Baguette, the future of food is a spectrum of possibilities. On one end of the spectrum is the need for solutions that address regions experiencing food insecurity and the effect of climate change on global food production. At the other end of the spectrum, sophisticated consumers are demanding

A Look at Tomorrow’s Dinners

A recent article in The Guardian examined what the future’s foods might look like. Some are new takes on current foods, such as fermented coffee and jellyfish ‘n’ chips, as well as entirely new creations, such as lab-grown meat and allergy-free peanuts. Other future foods might include algae, animal-free milk and egg whites, and crickets.

Getting People to Eat Bugs

Getting People to Eat Bugs

With the population rising, feeding more and more people will depend on sufficient resources. Insects are a good fit, but getting people to want to eat them poses a problem. Some companies are disguising the buggy components by disguising them within familiar foods, starting with ice cream, according to a story on Business Insider. Still,

A Look Back at Produce from the Past

A Look Back at Produce from the Past

Genetically modified foods, or GMOs, inspire strong reactions nowadays, but humans have been tweaking the genetics of our favorite produce for millennia. Whether it involved splicing genes from other organisms to give plants desired traits or using selective breeding over a long period of time, according to Business Insider, crops today are vastly different from

Millennials are obsessed with food

Millennials are obsessed with food

Digital connections and social media have put food front and center with Millennials, who are changing the food landscape, according to The Atlantic. Eve Turow, author of A Taste of Generation Yum: How the Millennial Generation’s Love for Organic Fare, Celebrity Chefs, and Microbrews Will Make or Break the Future of Food, believes that food

Top