Sustainability

Health

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Eating cheese may benefit your gut

Scientists may have just discovered another reason to nosh on cheese: a recent study showed that eating fermented dairy products may have a positive effect on the gut’s microbiota, according to a story in Time. Cheese—and to a degree, milk—help gut bacteria reduce the production of TMAO, a metabolite created when digesting red meat that

Walmir Coutinho Hero

The expanding obesity crisis in emerging nations

World Obesity Federation president Dr. Walmir Coutinho sees his native Brazil as an example of the dietary challenges that come with increasing prosperity. Endocrinologist Walmir Coutinho is a lifelong champion in the fight against obesity. The 55-year-old Brazilian physician and current president of the World Obesity Federation has dedicated his entire career to educating people

ThinkstockPhotos-122400101_HERO

Eating cheese may benefit your gut

Scientists may have just discovered another reason to nosh on cheese: a recent study showed that eating fermented dairy products may have a positive effect on the gut’s microbiota, according to a story in Time. Cheese—and to a degree, milk—help gut bacteria reduce the production of TMAO, a metabolite created when digesting red meat that

Innovation

In the Kitchen with Chef Watson

In the Kitchen with Chef Watson

Cognitive Cooking with Chef Watson, a new cookbook by IBM and the Institute of Culinary Education, presents more than 65 recipes partially created by a cognitive computer named Watson, according to a story on Yahoo! Food. Once loaded with thousands of recipes and a database of food chemical compositions and common flavor pairings, Watson created

In the Kitchen with Chef Watson

In the Kitchen with Chef Watson

Cognitive Cooking with Chef Watson, a new cookbook by IBM and the Institute of Culinary Education, presents more than 65 recipes partially created by a cognitive computer named Watson, according to a story on Yahoo! Food. Once loaded with thousands of recipes and a database of food chemical compositions and common flavor pairings, Watson created

Food Safety

Sensor Detects Meat Safety

Sensor Detects Meat Safety

MIT chemists have devised an inexpensive, portable sensor that can detect gases emitted by rotting meat, allowing consumers to determine whether the meat in their grocery store or refrigerator is safe to eat. According to MIT News, the sensor, which consists of chemically modified carbon nanotubes, could be deployed in “smart packaging” that would offer

Food Culture

The Film

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